Tao Te Ching (chapter six)

good vs evil

original interpretation . . .

Spirit of the valley is immortal.
It is called the mystic nature.
The gate o f the mystic nature is regarded as the root of the universe.
It is everlasting and cannot be consumed.

my interpretation . . .

The Yin mother never dies.
Her home is in the valley.
Her womb is the birth place of all thingsit will never dry up.
Mother Yin eternally woos Father Yang from his place of light upon the mountain top.
For it’s in her valley where he plants his seed and learns the meaning of the Tao.
This endless cycle is what keeps man rooted to the Earth. 

Is not the earth a school house and pathway to the gods?

 

Tao Te Ching (chapter five)

good vs evil

Original interpretation . . .

Nature nurtures all things with the wholeness of complete virtue.

It shows the greatest and perfect kindness by giving life to let all things grow and accomplish them with the hastening of harvest.

Therefore, according to ancient custom, nature may seem unkind to regard all beings as a traditional straw dog for sacrifice.

And likewise with a saint, he may seem unkind to regard people as a traditional straw dog for sacrifice.

The space between heaven and earth is like the bellows, it appears empty yet it gives a supply that never fails;

The more it moves, the more it brings forth. Many words lead to exhaustion.

It is better to center on the true essence within.

My interpretation . . .

Creation, though seemingly ruthless at times, has a joyous plan for all living things.

There is a special plan for mankind, that once in place, will have made the moments of joy followed by the hours of sorrow that we now endure, well worth the struggle.

Do not the heavens breathe life onto this earth as well as withdraw it?

Quietly we stand in awe, listening for the Tao, as it breathes life onto this planet and into it’s inhabitants.

 

Tao Te Ching (chapter four)

good vs evil

Original interpretation:

Tao (The Way) can be infused into the nature and put to use without being exhausted. It is so deep and subtle like an abyss that is the origin of all things.

It is complete and perfect as a wholeness that can Round off sharp edges;

Resolve confusion; Harmonize with the glory;

Act in unity with the lowliness.

Tao is so profound and yet in invisible, It exists in everywhere and anywhere. I do not know whose Son It is, It existed before heaven and earth.

My interpretation:

Because the Tao exists in the unknown world, it has no beginning, nor does it have an ending.

Therefore it fills the known creation from the endless source that will never run dry.

Like an ocean wave the Tao will eventually:

Blunt the sharpest object.

Untangle the largest knot.

Soften the strongest glare.

The Tao will ultimately work balance into all things.

Intuitively man senses her presence, but the Tao reveals herself so quietly, or so loudly, from so great a distance, or so closely, who can know her?

Is she the mother of God?

Tao Te Ching (chapter three)

good vs evil

Original . . .

By not adoring the worthy, people will not fall into dispute.

By not valuing the hard to get objects, people will not become robbers. By not seeing the desires of lust, one’s heart will not be confused.

Therefore the governing of the saint is to empty one’s mind, substantiate one’s virtue, weaken one’s worldly ambition and strengthen one’s essence.

He lets the people to be innocent of worldly knowledge and desire, and keeps the clever ones from making trouble with their wits.

Acts naturally without desire, then everything will be accomplished in its natural order.

My interpretation . . .

The wise man knows it’s best to lead by example rather than by words.

He understands the hearts of men and treats all, regardless of rank, equally.

He is as comfortable feasting with kings as he is sharing bread with the laborer.

He respects all men under his control, but his eyes remain open.

He watches over his men diligently, but from a distance.

The charlatan soon learns to take his evil deeds elsewhere.

Tao Te Ching (chapter Two)

good vs evil

Original . . .

As soon as beauty is known by the world as beautiful, it becomes ugly.

As soon as virtue is being known as something good, it becomes evil.

Therefore being and non-being give birth to each other.

Difficult and easy accomplish each other.

Long and short form each other.

High and low distinguish each other.

Sound and tone harmonize each other.

Before and after follow each other as a sequence.

Realizing this, the saint performs effortlessly according to the natural Way without personal desire, and practices the wordless teaching thru one’s deeds.

The saint inspires the vitality of all lives, without holding back. He nurtures all beings with no wish to take possession of.

My interpretation . . .

We only know beauty because there is ugliness.

We only know good because there is evil.

Without this duality how would we learn to make the right choices? How would we grow in wisdom? How would we experience the joy if we had not the counter weight of sorrow? For every positive in life there is a negative to accompany it.

A wise man understands the necessity for duality, but he does not succumb to its negative influence, rather he seeks a perfect balance between the two.

A wise man enjoys the learning curve he must take to create the object far more than it’s completion.

A wise man has the ability to see both sides of an argument. He knows that perception leads the hearts of men, and makes allowances for it’s deception in others as well as himself.

He is empathetic towards those who take the opposite view, and never glories in prideful conceit.

His success goes with him and his works endure forever.