Tao Te Ching (chapter nine)

good vs evil

 

Original Interpretation:

Those who overly pride wealth is like the overflowing water which shall cause damages. It is better to restrain early.

Those who are not content with fame is like polishing the edge of a knife. The sharper it gets, the easier it is to break.

Wealth and treasures are but illusions that one cannot possess.

Those who are arrogant of their wealth and fame shall invite blame upon oneself.

 

My Interpretation:

Watch the ego, get too full of yourself and you will just make a mess of everything.

Don’t think the knife will remain sharp forever . . . it won’t.

Everything in the Known ultimately deteriorates.

Why be such a fool as to store your wealth in another man’s house, where it will just become a source of worry?

Why not release those chains of insecurity, and share your possessions with the needy while you can?

Then when you age and retire you will be at peace within the Tao and have no fear of death.

Tao Te Ching (chapter eight)

good vs evil

Original interpretation:

A person of great virtue is like the flowing water. Water benefits all things and contends not with them.

It puts itself in a place that no one wishes to be and thus is closest to Tao. A virtuous person is like water which adapts itself to the perfect place. His mind is like the deep water that is calm and peaceful.

His heart is kind like water that benefits all.

His words are sincere like the constant flow of water.

His governing is natural without desire which is like the softness of water that penetrates through hard rocks.

His work is of talent like the free flow of water.

His movement is of right timing like water that flows smoothly.

A virtuous person never forces his way and hence will not make faults.

 

My interpretation:

The Tao is like an oasis in the desert. Her waters provide an endless source of nourishment to all life forms.

To a home she provides the foundation.

To the mind she guards us from foolish thoughts.

She teaches us the way of kindness when dealing with others.

In speech she teaches us to guard our tongue and speak in a simple, direct voice so as not to confuse anyone with double talk.

In government she teaches us orderliness and humility of purpose.

In all our affairs we must call upon her wisdom.

She teaches us not to put off till tomorrow what we should do today.

The Tao never forces us into a corner in such a way that we could blame her for our silliness.

 

 

Tao Te Ching (chapter seven)

good vs evil

Original interpretation:

Heaven is everlasting and earth is enduring.

The reason that they are everlasting is because they do not exist for themselves. Hence, they are long lived.

Thus, although the saint puts himself last, finds himself in the lead. Although he is not self-concerned, finds himself accomplished.

It is because he is not focused on self-interests and hence can fulfill his true nature.

 

My interpretation:

Heaven and Earth will exist forever because they are the known presence of the unknown Tao. (God)

The wise man understands the meaning of “oneness” therefore as he quietly remains in shadow, his spirit dances in the sun light for all to see.

Tao Te Ching (chapter six)

good vs evil

original interpretation . . .

Spirit of the valley is immortal.
It is called the mystic nature.
The gate o f the mystic nature is regarded as the root of the universe.
It is everlasting and cannot be consumed.

my interpretation . . .

The Yin mother never dies.
Her home is in the valley.
Her womb is the birth place of all thingsit will never dry up.
Mother Yin eternally woos Father Yang from his place of light upon the mountain top.
For it’s in her valley where he plants his seed and learns the meaning of the Tao.
This endless cycle is what keeps man rooted to the Earth. 

Is not the earth a school house and pathway to the gods?

 

Tao Te Ching (chapter five)

good vs evil

Original interpretation . . .

Nature nurtures all things with the wholeness of complete virtue.

It shows the greatest and perfect kindness by giving life to let all things grow and accomplish them with the hastening of harvest.

Therefore, according to ancient custom, nature may seem unkind to regard all beings as a traditional straw dog for sacrifice.

And likewise with a saint, he may seem unkind to regard people as a traditional straw dog for sacrifice.

The space between heaven and earth is like the bellows, it appears empty yet it gives a supply that never fails;

The more it moves, the more it brings forth. Many words lead to exhaustion.

It is better to center on the true essence within.

My interpretation . . .

Creation, though seemingly ruthless at times, has a joyous plan for all living things.

There is a special plan for mankind, that once in place, will have made the moments of joy followed by the hours of sorrow that we now endure, well worth the struggle.

Do not the heavens breathe life onto this earth as well as withdraw it?

Quietly we stand in awe, listening for the Tao, as it breathes life onto this planet and into it’s inhabitants.